Having taken on the management of a (much larger than first intended) garden landscaping project last year (ruining the garden just in time for summer in the process!) I had several 'opportunities' to focus on the key learning from our own developing resilience workshop. We’ve been developing the workshop over the last couple of years and, whilst resilience takes a lot of time and effort to develop, there are some core lessons that will help develop your levels of resilience. The learning in brief: manage negative emotions as they arise define the problem you need to solve and focus on the positive opportunities generate options and define a plan to begin tackling the problem   The power of emotions You might work with someone where you can always tell when they’re under pressure/anxious/having a bad day – the ‘mood hoovers’. Think of the last...

How many new year resolutions have you made? Lose weight, do more exercise, detox, spend more time with the family? Let's face it we know we're going to fail (must think more positively this year), but I can recommend a great book which might just help. It's called 'The Power of Habit' by Charles Duhigg and I thoroughly recommend it. The author is 'an author' rather than a 'management guru' so it's extremely well written and easy to read. It basically outlines that our habits are pretty much hard wired so are extremely difficult to change. But they can be changed. It's so powerful that we're now including it in our core workshops to strengthen the learning for people who attend. The challenge is to identify your default behavioural patterns - your habits. Work out what triggers them, and ideally what it...

For today’s organisation, teamwork is more important than ever. Teams have become the basic unit through which work is carried out in organisations. Research shows that top management teams will often make strategic decisions which may influence the long term sustainability of their organisation. Effective teamwork is also essential for carrying out safety critical operations in high risk work environments. Finally, the use of teams has also been shown to improve employee satisfaction and commitment. So what does effective teamwork look like? As part of a project carried out in conjunction with the University of Hertfordshire, Realworld Consulting have examined the latest literature in an effort to understand what effective teamwork looks like today. These are some of our key findings: Effective teams are comprised of individuals who have positive relationships with each other… Where team members have positive relationships, they share...

Over the last 10 years or so we have been helping companies identify the reasons their people leave. Our exit survey data shows that pretty much half of all leavers do so because of a perceived lack of career progression and development. In parallel I had a coaching session with a newly appointed director this week and one of the issues that arose from his 360 degree feedback was around team members not feeling as though they are being developed, which prompted a discussion around how to do that more effectively. There were three common, but important beliefs that the director was holding onto. Belief number 1: Development equals training – “I’ll send them on a course!”. Well, there is a place for training as I’ll highlight later, but our exit data also shows that even where access to training is rated positively, people...